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Anonymous Philippines hackers attack NTC website

Four days after attacking a number of government websites, hacktivist group Anonymous Philippines defaced the online portal of the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) as part of its continuing online protest against the newly-passed Cybercrimes Prevention Act of 2012.

Anonymous Philippines hackers attacked the website of National Telecommunications Comission on Monday midnight

Rock music can be heard upon accessing the homepage of the defaced NTC website. The group posted a note saying that they are seizing the NTC.gov.ph domain because individuals and entities operating the website have been “indicted” for “crimes” like conspiracy, violations of human rights, corruption, copyright infringement, money laundering, PIRACY (sic), misuse of devices, libel, plagiarism, and destruction of freedom of speech.

The defaced website features the trademark of PrivateX and #pR.is0n3r. The wording of Anonymous Philippines’ brief note is a play on the text being posted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation on websites in seizes – more recently the file sharing site MegaUpload.com.

Earlier this year, the FBI seized the website MegaUpload.com (click to enlarge)

Meanwhile, in a statement, Maien Vital, executive director of the Institute for Development and Econometric Analysis (IDEA) said that while their organization understands the advocacy of Anonymous Philippines, the group should find “a better way to advance it without causing undue stress to the private sector and civil society.” IDEA’s website remains inaccessible as of posting time after it was hacked last Thursday.

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9 thoughts on “Anonymous Philippines hackers attack NTC website”

  1. Y.B. Masdal says:

    It really escapes me how these so-called super-genius “hackers” can access and deface websites just like that; it’s cool like being code genius, but I guess its mean and could be tantamount to commission of a grave crime; since important data and information are jeopardized. Just imagined if PAGASA website is hacked then we’d be put in harms way for not being informed of tumultuous weather…tsk..tsk..

    1. markpere2010 says:

      Sir, I also share your views, but nevertheless, I think our attention should remain focused on the essential issues at stake – which is our freedom of expression online.

  2. biyahilo says:

    It’s one form of protest, like having a rally in front of an embassy (a lot of people may be . I’m not saying I agree with the manner they did it. Appropriate though, considering it is cybercrime they are protesting against.

  3. biyahilo says:

    It’s one form of protest, like having a rally in front of an embassy (a lot of people may be inconvenienced). I’m not saying I agree with the manner they did it. Appropriate though, considering it is cybercrime they are protesting against.

    1. markpere2010 says:

      My worry is that these series of hackings on government websites may distract people’s attention from the core issues (e.g. online libel).

  4. ognir says:

    yes if I were the lawmakers, THINK first, of what to do first…..not to make laws without cultivating first of what we can cultivate to cyber…..not making that cybercrime laws directly without knowing the advantages and disadvantages….

    1. markpere2010 says:

      You’re right on the mark. I just find it funny that no one raised a hell about this law when it was still being discussed in the Senate. Natutulog ba tayo sa pansitan noon?

  5. unknown says:

    🙂

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